Alan Turing's former Cheshire home with blue plaque hits market

Key to the code breaker’s door: Alan Turing’s former Victorian five-bed Cheshire home with blue plaque honouring the Bletchley Park hero hits market for £1.1m

  • Copper Folly has three bathrooms and three reception rooms with a basement that could be a home office
  • The property has been carefully looked after since Alan Turing’s death in 1954 and is now worth £1.1million
  • Modern upgrades include an open-plan shaker-style kitchen-diner featuring granite work surfaces
  • On the outside wall of the house is a blue plaque revealing Turing lived and died in the property 

Alan Turing’s former Victorian five-bed Cheshire home featuring a blue plaque to honour the Bletchley Park hero has been listed for sale at £1.1million.

The property has been carefully looked after since Turing’s death in 1954, with modern upgrades including an open-plan shaker-style kitchen-diner featuring granite work surfaces.

Outside, the walled garden is equally impressive, with a generous lawn area surrounded by mature trees to offer privacy and a patio for al fresco dining.

On the front of the house, the iconic English Heritage plaque reads: ‘Alan Turing 1912-1954. Founder of computer science and cryptographer, whose work was key to breaking the wartime Enigma codes, lived and died here.’

Turing is famous for his cryptography work and in 1936 developed the idea for the Universal Turing Machine – the basis for the first computer.

Copper Folly (pictured), a 2,900sq ft house in Cheshire, has three bathrooms and three reception rooms, with a basement that could be turned into a home office, gym or cinema room

On the front of the house, the iconic English Heritage plaque reads: ‘Alan Turing 1912-1954. Founder of computer science and cryptographer, whose work was key to breaking the wartime Enigma codes, lived and died here’

The mathematician was also based at Bletchley Park during his career and worked on cracking the Enigma code during World War II.

He was granted a posthumous pardon in 2013 by the Queen after his prosecution in 1952 for homosexual acts and six years later was named the greatest person of the 20th century by a BBC audience.

The current owners said it was a ‘privilege’ to live somewhere with ‘such incredible history’.

The property has been carefully looked after since Turing’s death in 1954, with modern upgrades including an open-plan shaker-style kitchen-diner featuring granite work surfaces

Outside, the walled garden is equally impressive, with a generous lawn area surrounded by mature trees to offer privacy and a patio for al fresco dining

Turing is famous for his cryptography work and in 1936 developed the idea for the Universal Turing Machine – the basis for the first computer. Pictured, the hallway has two doors into the kitchen/diner

The mathematician was also based at Bletchley Park during his career and worked on cracking the Enigma code during World War II. Pictured, the dining room

A sweeping driveway features a manicured lawn and a variety of bushes and trees to provide shade and privacy

Turing was granted a posthumous pardon in 2013 by the Queen after his prosecution in 1952 for homosexual acts and six years later was named the greatest person of the 20th century by a BBC audience

‘Copper Folly offers the opportunity to purchase a timelessly attractive Victorian residence of historical importance,’ said Andrew Thorpe, head of office at Savills Wilmslow branch.

‘Beautifully presented and ready to move into, the property offers tremendous further potential for extension or improvements, if someone should wish.’

The property is offered with a guide price of £1.1 million. 

The home’s current owners said it was a ‘privilege’ to live somewhere with ‘such incredible history’. Pictured, the garden

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