Harry Styles Is Wearing a Full Gown on the Cover of 'Vogue'

Harry Styles. In a gown. On the cover of Vogue. Need I say more?

The British crooner and non-conforming fashion icon covers Vogue’s December issue, blowing up a pale blue balloon in a matching tiered Victorian-style lace Gucci gown with black trim paired with a navy Gucci blazer. You, know … as one does.

Elsewhere in the story, Styles poses for a photo with his sister, Gemma Styles, in what’s meant as a “surprise” for their mother.

“My mum loved to dress us up,” Gemma recalled. “I always hated it, and Harry was always quite into it. She did some really elaborate papier-mâché outfits: She made a giant mug and then painted an atlas on it, and that was Harry being ‘The World Cup.’ Harry also had a little dalmatian-dog outfit.”

Speaking to his own personal style, the singer said, “You can never be overdressed. There’s no such thing.”

Harry Styles

“The people that I looked up to in music — Prince and David Bowie and Elvis and Freddie Mercury and Elton John — they’re such showmen,” he continued. “As a kid it was completely mind-blowing. Now I’ll put on something that feels really flamboyant, and I don’t feel crazy wearing it. I think if you get something that you feel amazing in, it’s like a superhero outfit. Clothes are there to have fun with and experiment with and play with.”

Addressing his propensity toward clothing items and accessories conventionally seen as “feminine,” Styles said, “What’s really exciting is that all of these lines are just kind of crumbling away. When you take away ‘There’s clothes for men and there’s clothes for women,’ once you remove any barriers, obviously you open up the arena in which you can play. I’ll go in shops sometimes, and I just find myself looking at the women’s clothes thinking they’re amazing. It’s like anything — anytime you’re putting barriers up in your own life, you’re just limiting yourself. There’s so much joy to be had in playing with clothes. I’ve never really thought too much about what it means — it just becomes this extended part of creating something.”

“It’s pretty powerful and kind of extraordinary to see someone in his position redefining what it can mean to be a man with confidence,” Styles’s Don’t Worry Darling director Olivia Wilde told the magazine.

Naturally, the singer’s norm-defying style isn’t exclusive to Vogue’s cover. Within the story he gives us Comme des Garçons kilts! Private school-ready plaid skirts! Hand-painted yellow corduroys! Tulle-bearing trench coats! AND. MORE.

We do not deserve this man. 

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